Research Practice Practice Research

Fine Art Research Network Symposium

Friday, 15 July 2016 (All day)

Event Institution: 

NAFAE

Event Partner: 

The University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts, Arts Research Initiative (ARI)

Event Keynote: 

Professor Dr Anne Douglas, Grays School of Art

Callout Link: 

http://nafae.org.uk/news/research-practice-practice-research

Tags:
PhD
Research

Booking website:

Event Booking Name: 

Andrew Sheridan

Event Email:

admin@nafae.org.uk

Free to NAFAE members

Event Address: 

The University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Bowerham Road
Lancaster
Lancashire
LA1 3JD
United Kingdom

Venue Google Map: 

Click to view on Google Maps

Event Contact Name: 

Robert Williams

Event Email:

robert.williams@cumbria.ac.uk

Venue website:

Links:

  • View and download the Symposium Programme
  • Register for the symposium (the deadline is the 5 July): Eventbrite - Research Practice Practice Research

  • Introduction

    A symposium exploring aspects of doctoral research in Fine Art practice and Fine Art pedagogy organised by NAFAE in collaboration with the University of Cumbria. We are offering an opportunity to present a paper about what you are researching, and how you are researching it or, if you are supervisor, strategies for supervision.

    The aim of the symposium is to explore and debate issues of fine art research. It is hoped that a broad range of approaches to fine art research may be represented, to facilitate discussion of the range of topics being researched, and the methods being used to research them.

    The symposium follows the NAFAE Fine Art Research Network Symposium 'Correlating Theory and Practice in Fine Art Research' at London Metropolitan University on 27 March 2015.

  • Getting there

    Location

    Download a campus map
    Download a map of Lancaster

    The strand sessions and bag storage are all in the College North, building 8 on the campus map: N1 (bag storage), N7, N16, & N17 in the programme.
    The main room is is the Hugh Pollard Lecture Theatre, building 17 on the campus map, HPLT in the programme.

    Parking

    Download Parking details

    Accommodation

    If you have booked into the Mill Hall university accommodation please remember that they are not on campus but but in the town centre, by the canal at Moor Lane LA1 1QD You can download the map here:
    Lancaster Map

    Bags

    There is storage available on the day at the venue for any bags in room N1.
    This is open at 8:00 – 9:30; for lunch: 12:00 – 13:00 and at the end of the day: 17:30 – 19:00.


    Getting There by road

    From the north:
    • Leave the M6 at junction 34 and follow signs to the city centre.
    • Travel south, keeping in the left lane of the one-way system.
    • Just past the Royal Lancaster Infirmary (on the right), take the first exit at the large roundabout onto Bowerham Road.
    • The entrance to the campus is 300 yards on the left, opposite Bowerham Primary School.

    From the south

    Leave the M6 at junction 33 and follow the A6 into Lancaster. At the first roundabout, take the third exit onto Bowerham Road. The entrance to the campus is 300 yards on the left, opposite Bowerham Primary School.

    Getting there by rail

    Lancaster is on the main west coast rail line from London to Glasgow.
    The campus is a 30-minute walk or short taxi ride away.
    Walking from the station

    • Leave the station passing the main ticket office and via the station slip road and left onto,
    • Meeting House Ln. Continue to the traffic lights at the bottom of the hill and,
    • Turn right onto King St/A6. continue straight ahead, against the flow of road traffic
    • At the canal bridge traffic lights, continue straight ahead, remaining on A6
    • At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto Bowerham Rd
    • The entrance to the campus is 300 yards on the left. There is a pedestrian footpath.
  • Call Out

    The Fine Art Research Network invites the submission of abstracts that might include some of the following:

    • topic being researched
    • aim of the research
    • method for researching the topic
    • methodology
    • pedagogic strategies

    Abstracts are invited from MPhil/PhD students, and post-doctoral researchers, and MPhil/PhD supervisors. Collaborative papers produced by supervisors with supervisees are welcomed, along with other forms of collaborative work.

    Abstracts may address the following questions (though they are not limited to them):

    • Why the methods you are using are appropriate for your research aim? And why they are more appropriate than other methods?
    • Methodological innovations: how an existing research method has been developed and adapted for your research, and the reason?
    • How methods developed by other subject areas might be used in fine art research?
    • What are useful models of MPhil/PhD research in Fine Art?
    • What methods are useful for practice-based research?

Schwitters Trip: Saturday,16 July 2016

There is a coach trip on Saturday 16th July to visit Kurt Schwitters' Merz Barn at Elterwater, near Ambleside, and to the Schwitters Archive at the Armitt Museum.

Schedule

The bus pick up point at Lancaster Campus will be outside the main reception.
Bus Schedule:

  • 9:00 Picked up at University of Cumbria Lancaster Campus
  • 10:15 Arrive at Elterwater
  • 11:30 Picked up from Elterwater
  • 11:45 Arrive at University of Cumbria Ambleside Campus
  • 15:00 Depart from University of Cumbria Ambleside Campus

The visit is hosted by Littoral Arts and seeks to extend the MerzNorth network of researchers who examine and respond to the legacy of Kurt Schwitters.
LITTORAL is a non-profit arts trust that promotes new creative partnerships, critical art practices and cultural strategies in response to issues about social, environmental and economic change.

The coach trip is free to NAFAE members.
Please register for the Schwitters trip on the on Eventbrite:
www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/schwitters-merz-barn-trip-tickets-21636537466 


The symposium is FREE to members.
Institutional Membership: £150
Individual membership: £30 (£20 artists and students).

Subscribe on-line at: www.nafae.org.uk/about/joining-nafae
(please note: the institutional subscription fee of £150 entitles members to 5 free places at any of our conferences or symposia throughout the year).


Accomodation:

The event venue will be the University of Cumbria Lancaster Campus, Bowerham Road.
Basic accommodation will be available on campus for £25 per night.
If you require accommodation please download the Booking Form and email to pilar.garcia-sanchez@cumbria.ac.uk.
Please book accommodation before the 17 June 2016.


Event Map Location: 

Event Papers: 

Presentation Papers: 

Collecting, showing and staging plants: A filmic analysis of the Botanical Garden Berlin-Dahlem: Its history(ies) and projections in contemporaneity
Barbara Barreto Marcel da Fonseca, Bauhaus-Universität Weimer
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Barbara Marcel Paper [3mb]
PDF icon Barbara Barreto Marcel Abstract [70kb]
PDF icon Barbara Barreto Marcel Biography [18kb]

Art writing as moving image: Exploring film frame as page
Emma Bolland, Sheffield Hallam University
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Emma Bolland presentation [353kb]
PDF icon Emma Bolland paper [4mb]
PDF icon Emma Bolland Abstract [33kb]
PDF icon Emma Bolland Biography [28kb]

Phenomenological analysis as a methodology for practice-led research in Fine Art
Alberto Condotta
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Alberto Condotta presentation [220kb]
PDF icon Alberto Condotta Abstract [71kb]
PDF icon Alberto Condotta Biography [40kb]

What’s the use? Art research and userological turn
Marsha Bradfield, Chelsea College of Art
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Marsha Bradfield Abstract [59kb]

Disturbing the meaning
Marie Brenneis, London Metropolitan University
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Marie Brenneis Presentation [1.4mb]
PDF icon Marie Brenneis Abstract [40kb]
PDF icon Marie Brenneis Biography [26kb]

Feral objects and acts of domestic piracy
Paula Chambers, Leeds College of Art
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Paula Chambers presentation [4mb]
PDF icon Paula Chambers Abstract [24kb]
PDF icon Paula Chambers Biography [30kb]

Choreographic methods in installation work: Intersections between visual arts and dance
Inês Bento Coelho, Glasgow School of Art
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Inês Bento Coelho Presentation [500kb]
PDF icon Inês Bento Coelho paper [1mb]
PDF icon Inês Bento Coelho Abstract [80kb]
PDF icon Inês Bento Coelho Biography [111kb]

Visualising the unseen: Drawing the hidden aspects of neurological disorders
Rachel Daniel, Lancaster University
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Rachel Daniel paper [688kb]
PDF icon Rachel Daniel Abstract [265kb]
PDF icon Rachel Daniel Biography [46kb]

Synaesthetic colour responses to letters of the alphabet: An investigation through fine art textiles
Gweneifur Fereday, Middlesex University
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital Strand
PDF icon Gweneifur Fereday presentation [424kb]
PDF icon Gweneifur Fereday paper [68kb]
PDF icon Gweneifur Fereday Abstract [37kb]
PDF icon Gweneifur Fereday Biography [34kb]

Brecht and the village of Figgate: A critical contextualization of the origins and uses of a cultural materialist theory and the aesthetic strategies informing a series of consciously satiric, ‘counter-hegemonic’ paintings
Martin Fowler, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Martin Fowler presentation [1.2mb]
PDF icon Martin Fowler paper [80kb]
PDF icon Martin Fowler Abstract [38kb]

Reflections on the good, the bad and the ugly
Sheila Gaffney, University of Huddersfield
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Sheila Gaffney presentation [388kb]
PDF icon Sheila Gaffney Abstract [27kb]
PDF icon Sheila Gaffney Biography [44kb]

Autonomic Drawing: A postphenomenological research project
Joe Graham, Royal College of Art
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Joe Graham presentation [6mb]
PDF icon Joe Graham Abstract [37kb]

Deleuze and painting: Re-thinking the formal
Simon Harris, University of Wolverhampton
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Simon Harris presentation [3mb]
PDF icon Simon Harris Abstract [45kb]

In lostness possibilities are found
Laura M R Harrison, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Laura M R Harrison presentation [413kb]
PDF icon Laura M R Harrison Abstract [29kb]

Smells like Kurt’s Spirit: A sensory exploration of Kurt Schwitters’ spirted legacy of Merz
Jackie Haynes, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Jackie Haynes paper [185kb]
PDF icon Jackie Haynes Abstract [26kb]
PDF icon Jackie Haynes Biography [24kb]

Identifying new cultures of learning within the context of fine art education
Jake Jackson, Glasgow School of Art
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Jake Jackson presentation [759kb]
PDF icon Jake Jackson Abstract [88kb]

How methods developed by other subject areas might be used in fine art research?
Louise Janvier, University of Central Lancashire
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Louise Janvier paper [2mb]
PDF icon Louise Janvier Abstract [72kb]
PDF icon Louise Janvier Biography [23kb]

Clay Bodies as a space for habituation: Habituation structures can they relieve displacement?
Nayoung Jeong, University College London
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Nayoung Jeong presentation [606kb]
PDF icon Nayoung Jeong Abstract [62kb]
PDF icon Nayoung Jeong Biography [27kb]

Painting and materiality: Folding painting out into the world
Allyson Keehan, Glasgow School of Art
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Allyson Keehan Presentation [759kb]
PDF icon Allyson Keehan Paper [22kb]
PDF icon Allyson Keehan Abstract [43kb]
PDF icon allyson_keehan_biography_2016.pdf

The Dialogic: Art work as method
John Hammersley and Rachelle Viader Knowles,Coventry University
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon John Hammersley & Rachelle Viader Knowles paper [146kb]
PDF icon John Hammersley & Rachelle Viader Knowles Abstract [55kb]
PDF icon John Hammersley & Rachelle Viader Knowles Biography [34kb]

Augury, noctilucence and de-severance: Uncanniness in northerly landscapes
Patti Lean, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Patti Lean presentation [1.4mb]
PDF icon Patti Lean Abstract [51kb]
PDF icon Patti Lean Biography [41kb]

Positioning ones-self in the research process: Eliminating pseudo-science, a split personality and narcissism in combined arts and science research projects at Wrexham Glyndwr University
Susan Liggett, Wrexham Glyndwr University
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Susan Liggett presentation [1mb]
PDF icon Susan Liggett Abstract [84kb]
PDF icon Susan Liggett Biography [46kb]

Drawing: Being present, making present
Philippa Lyon, University of Brighton
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Philippa Lyon presentation [867kb]
PDF icon Philippa Lyon Abstract [47kb]
PDF icon Philippa Lyon Biography [23kb]

Theatres for enactment and reception: Psychoanalysis, performance art and virtual reality
Catherine Maffioletti, Ravensbourne College
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Catherine Maffioletti presentation [127kb]
PDF icon Catherine Maffioletti Abstract [1mb]
PDF icon Catherine Maffioletti Biography [164kb]

A work in process…
Annie Morrad, University of Lincoln
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Annie Morrad Abstract [26kb]
PDF icon Annie Morrad Biography [23kb]

The pedagogy of digital auto-ethnography and reflective practice: Creating virtual spaces for reflection
Joanna Neil, University of Glasgow
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Joanna Neil absract [47kb]

At the edge of precarity and vulnerability
Laura Onions, University of Wolverhampton
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Laura Onions presentation [9mb]
PDF icon Laura Onions paper [157kb]
PDF icon Laura Onions Abstract [132kb]
PDF icon Laura Onions Biography [15kb]

Directional forces: A short residency model for the development of creative practice for doctoral students, early career researchers and creative professionals
Hedley Roberts, University of East London
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Hedley Roberts presentation[6.8kb]
PDF icon Hedley Roberts Abstract [38kb]

From the surface of the image to the surface of the psyche: A practice-based research into the ontology of painting onto photographs
Carl Robinson, University of Derby
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon Carl Robinson presentation [843kb]
PDF icon Carl Robinson paper [155kb]
PDF icon Carl Robinson Abstract [59kb]
PDF icon Carl Robinson Biography [37kb]

Degrees of legibility: Written fiction as research methodology in the practice-led MPhil / PhD
David Steans
Strand 3  :
Research, Practice and Cultural Capital
PDF icon David Steans presentation[4mb]
PDF icon David Steans Abstract [110kb]
PDF icon David Steans Biography [25kb]

Building critical pedagogies into the neoliberal institution
Michela Lent, Teesside University; Paul Stewart, Teesside University
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Paul Stewart Michela Lent Abstract [23kb]

The penetrable screen
Jane Topping, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Jane Topping paper [70kb]
PDF icon Jane Topping Biography & Abstract [53kb]

Can we put a frame around fine art PhD research?
Jennifer Walden, University of Portsmouth
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Jenny Walden abstract [43kb]

Writing the pain of others: A stroll with disturbances: Rethinking ethical agency by the way of practice-based research
Johanna Willenfelt, University of Cumbria Institute of the Arts
Strand 2  :
Methodologies and Strategies – Research Practice
PDF icon Johanna Willenfelt document [71kb]
PDF icon Johanna Willenfelt presentation [3mb]
PDF icon Johanna Willenfelt Abstract [26kb]

The supernatural sex: Women, magick & mediumship: Assembling a field of fascination in contemporary art
Grace Williams, De Montfort University
Strand 1  :
Pedagogies, Institutions & Research
PDF icon Grace Williams presentation [1mb]
PDF icon Grace Williams Abstract [2.8mb]
PDF icon Grace Williams Biography[61kb]

Closing Remarks

We’ve had a wonderful day. It has been such a positive symposium. This is a magnificent attendance and we would like to thank all delegates for their enthusiasm and contribution to the days debates. We have had a huge range of papers and the engagement in each session suggests that this is activity that we need to repeat and sustain year on year. I now know quite a bit of what I didn’t know I don’t know, and I definitely want to find out more.

Thankfully, all of the abstracts are posted on-line on the NAFAE web-site, so conversation and exchange can continue and people can find one another through their practice and research interests. We do need to keep this network active and growing. It is important to remind everyone that this is a member’s network and that we welcome new members and fresh input. We have a strong and vibrant steering Association but we are always keen to grow and to extend debate in the best interests of Fine Art Education nationally.

We have to give special thanks to Laura Harrison and to Andy Sheridan. No event of this nature can succeed without the dedication of key individuals. Today’s organization has been flawless and great fun and we owe all of that to Laura and Andy. Thanks to our hosts at the Cumbria Institute of the Arts. Professor Robert Williams has put really energy and imagination into creating an event in Lancaster that sets a benchmark for future years. We would like to that Roddy Hunter, the Director of the Institute, and Professor Diane Cox, Director of the Research and Graduate School, for the support and generosity. Of course, thanks also to the NAFAE steering group, steadfast and reliable enthusiasts who will pursue almost any lost cause and turn it into an act of creation.

We were extremely fortunate to have Professor Anne Douglas from Grays School of Art throughout today and for Saturday’s trip to the Merz Barn. Anne managed to capture the core purpose of our symposium; indeed each of our symposia. This one, the one at London Met in 2015, and our certain commitment to our next one in 2017, proposed to take place at Wolverhampton. Quite early in her keynote she talked about “our way of knowing”, or our ways of knowing; she outlined the proposition that practitioners in the Fine Arts are open to possibilities and for different procedures and sensory engagements for dealing with and encountering the world. 

She referenced Hannah Arendt and one of her many, very beautiful quotes, this one from 1953; “Education is the point at which we decide whether we love the world enough”. She talked about this in reference to a specific crisis affecting education and the educational offer. We are reminded that we are in a type of crisis all of the time; we are responsible for the urgency of Fine Art education and for it’s constant evolution. But we have a particular crisis right now in the way that the Arts are being redacted from School curriculum and transduced within our culture to mere economics. What makes this crisis so hard to comprehend is that it origins and its causes have been produced by educated people; by politicians and the politically powerful who have had all of the privileges and rights afforded by a complete education and are now at pains to withdraw the rights of others. 

 

Whist we celebrate the right to education and expound the benefits and humanity that education can foster, we have to remember that educated people are causing our current crisis. It is educated people who have taken us to the brink of Brexit; the same people took us through a thoroughly (socially) corrupting referendum based on a singularly facile provocation. The same people are relentlessly pursuing and incentivizing the marketization of Higher Education with no obvious purpose other than privatization. They have and continue to privatize huge swathes of our national health service and other public services as a process of denuding the poor of resources simply so that they can feed the greedy. They have introduced the ill conceived Work Programme to devastating effect, arguably leading to increased mortality rates through suicides. They forced through the Bedroom Tax in full knowledge of the obscene impacts of such a policy on those who can least afford austerity. The same politicians, supported and instructed by their mogul media paymasters, ritually demonize migrants and those seeking sanctuary; a community who rarely are provided with a public voice or recourse to expression.  

And, of course, these same people, our political class, are dismantling whatever there was for Arts education in Schools and are disestablishing access to the arts and support for the arts in community settings; and all because? Silence, there is no because….other than they have ceased to care whether we love the world enough. These are people who have had the benefits and privileges of a liberal and vaguely inclusive system of education; they have had what they need. We currently find ourselves in a culture where education has encouraged or even motivated some people to love themselves rather than the world. 

This is a crisis alright; but we cannot blame it all on a policy environment bereft of humanity or progressive ideas. We have to engage. We have to know why we care. We have to know why it is that we would want our future students and artists to “love the world enough”.

This is a big, dare I say, strategic question. And, it leads to more detailed questions, such as: Who is it for? What might it be about? What is its proximity? As such, we are left questioning the very notion of cultural production and cultural consumption; how it is experienced and how it is valued. 

  • What is the geographic component of cultural practice?
  • What are the political dynamics and what is the power distribution of cultural production in all of its many forms?
  • What is the relative value of (a) cultural contribution?
  • What do cultural resources look and feel like (education being one of them)?
  • How does representation filter into and through cultural production to reflect integrity or truth?
  • How is agency and civil democracy accessed and enacted for the sake of continuing (or new) cultural production?

These are all questions that have been touched upon or scrutinized or deconstructed or tested throughout the research network symposium. This is why we need to debate, discuss and encourage research practices within our domain of the Fine Arts. It is why we need to unpick the essential components of the Fine Arts, contemporarily, as both cultural force and enacted politics. 

Basically, we need to know "why" and "how", rather than “whether”, we could love the world enough, and we need to permanently refresh (or innovate) in the process of forming attitudes towards Fine Art Education so that it is relevant and might apply to all or be discovered by anyone. Our “because” is that we need to offer resistance to the wider crisis in humanity that is dividing our communities, our neighbourhoods, our ethnicities, and our moral visions. We need to ensure that cultural production and consumption can be experienced as a democratic right. 

We need to nurture and value difference, and divergencies, and not knowing, and sensory wisdom, and we need to question definitive solutions or reductive or fixed regulatory beliefs.

Our priority must be to embrace ‘crisis’ in whatever form because it is our starting point and because there are others across society, powerful and influential people, who seek to solve a crisis rather than challenge its viability. 

In short, politicians can fuck right off!

Fine Art (Arts) education is for everyone. It is a democratic right. Equality of access is a measure of the quality of our democracy.  That means that our job as a research, practice, and teaching community, is to worry what that means and how it can be enacted.  

So we look forward to worrying about it again and often and to acting on our words. We keep going. We meet again, and again. We build a stronger network. We build allegiances. We encourage others. We advocate for the arts. We promote our ways of knowing. And we discover whether we can love the world enough.

Professor Paul Haywood
Co-Chair, NAFAE.